THE DHARMA DISCOURSES O...

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THE DHARMA DISCOURSES OF CARDINAL MASTER CHŎNGSAN(CHŎNGSAN CHONGSA PŎBŎ)

Part Two: Dharma Discourses

Chapter Twelve: The Way of Public-Spiritedness

15

15. The Master said, “In either one’s personal practice or public enterprises, there are those who pursue these either with a master’s mentality or a servant’s mentality. Practice performed with a master’s mentality refers to a person who practices with the confidence that this practice alone is the path of deliverance throughout all three time-periods; hence, whether one feels like practicing or not, and whether others recognize it or not, one steadily accumulates one’s power of practice. Practice performed with a servant’s mentality means when a person practices reluctantly and out of concern for the teacher’s or other people’s eyes and ears. In enterprises, too, a master’s mentality means being frugal with the public’s possessions as if they were one’s own, taking care of the Order’s members as if they were one’s own family, and taking the Order’s concerns and pleasures as if they were one’s own, thereby sharing with the Order its gains and losses, its hardships and joys. A servant’s mentality means to remain indifferent even when the Order’s properties are wasted and its reputation damaged as if those were none of one’s business, or any little merit one makes leaves signs of one’s merit-making so that one keeps complaining or just calculating how much recognition one receives. Because a master is attentive and unconcerned about being recognized, proper and boundless merits return to that person. Hence, if one steadily keeps up a master’s practice and enterprises, one will ultimately reach a realm where all the worlds of the ten directions become one’s own property. Such figures will be the great masters of our Order.”