THE DHARMA DISCOURSES O...

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THE DHARMA DISCOURSES OF CARDINAL MASTER CHŎNGSAN(CHŎNGSAN CHONGSA PŎBŎ)

Part Two: Dharma Discourses

Chapter Five: Foundational Principles

41

41. The Master said, “The relations of cause and effect can be differentiated largely into the four categories of mutual lifegiving, mutual harm, congruent consequence, and adverse consequence. The cause and effect of mutual lifegiving, which is causality involving wholesome causes and wholesome effects, refers to the congruent application of causes and effects for mutual lifegiving and allowing wholesome relations between cause and effect; those with this karmic affinity mutually support and rely on each other and are able to accomplish all things satisfactorily. The cause and effect of mutual harm, which involves unwholesome causes and unwholesome effects, refers to the principle of cause and effect that functions adversely, leading to mutual harm; those with this karmic affinity mutually oppose one another, and resent and obstruct one another. The cause and effect of congruent consequence is the law of cause and effect where, by establishing a good aspiration for enlightenment, a good hope, and a good vow, one cultivates one’s practice, and as a result, accomplishes one’s wishes as originally intended. The cause and effect of adverse consequence is the law of cause and effect where, full of arrogance, one looks down on others and abuses those of humble status, and thus receives adverse consequences opposite to what one wishes, such as incurring lowly karmic retribution.”